Title

Longitudinal Gender Differences in Objectified Body Consciousness and Weight-Related Attitudes and Behaviors: Cultural and Developmental Contexts in the Transition From College

Publication Date

2-1-2006

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Longitudinal analysis of objectified body consciousness, body esteem, self-acceptance, and weight-related attitudes and behaviors in young adults (115 women and 49 men), who were undergraduates in 1993, tested hypotheses developed from theory on the social construction of gendered bodies and the developmental contexts of the post-college transition. Gender differences in body surveillance, body shame, and body esteem and the relationships between these persisted, whereas the relationship between body esteem and self-acceptance decreased for women and was similar to men at Wave 2. For both women and men, body surveillance and body shame decreased and body esteem increased over time, even though BMI also increased. Men wanted to lose weight at levels similar to women at Wave 2 and were equally likely to exercise to control weight, but they were less likely than women to diet. These results fit both cohort and age-related changes models of body experience for women and men.

Publication Title

Sex Roles

Volume

54

Issue

3/4

First Page

159

Last Page

173

DOI

10.1007/s11199-006-9335-1

Version

pre-print, post-print

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