Title

Exploring Ethnic Variation in the Relationship Between Stress, Social Networks, and Depressive Symptoms Among Older Black Americans

Publication Date

2-1-2016

Document Type

Article

Abstract

The relationship between different types of stressors and depressive symptoms among older Black populations is poorly understood. Even less is known about the social networks that might buffer different stressors on individuals within Black ethnic groups. The purpose of this study was to examine whether there are differences in the relationship between stress and social networks on depressive symptoms by ethnic group while ethnicity functioned as a proxy for culture. Data were drawn from the National Survey of American Life, which includes older African Americans (N = 837) and Caribbean Blacks (N = 271). In this survey, the measures of stress were perceived discrimination and material hardship; measures of social networks were social support and social connectedness. The association between perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms was significant for both groups while the association between material hardship and depressive symptoms was only significant for older African Americans. Results also indicate that compared with African Americans, Caribbean Blacks derived greater protective effects against depression from social support and social connectedness in late life.

Publication Title

Journal of Black Psychology

Volume

42

Issue

1

First Page

54

Last Page

72

DOI

10.1177/0095798414562067

Version

pre-print, post-print

This document is currently not available here.

Find in your library

Share

COinS