Presenter Information

Gabriel D. RobertsFollow

Degree Name

Master of Interdisciplinary Studies (MA)

Department

Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences

Streaming Media

Location

Carwein Auditorium (KEY 102), UW Tacoma

Event Website

http://guides.lib.uw.edu/tactalks

Start Date

19-5-2016 6:00 PM

End Date

19-5-2016 6:05 PM

Abstract

For this presentation, I will use textual analysis of psychedelic literature to show the three major movements within the genre, which demonstrate the philosophical value of the experience.

The first wave of psychedelic literature, particularly well exemplified by Aldous Huxley, popularized there psychedelic experience through nonfiction. It drew on the novelty of the experience and benefited from the optimism of the pre-“War on Drugs” era. The second wave of literature reflects the popularization of the psychedelic experience in a bohemian public setting, infusing psychedelic literature with spiritual overtones. During this second wave, the casual use of psychedelics was popularized without an awareness of the potential problems associated with casual use, leading to negative outcomes and the criminalization of psychedelic drug use. In the current third wave, psychedelic literature has become more academic in tone with a focus on the mental health benefits of psychedelics for people suffering from terminal illness, depression and PTSD.

I analyze the rhetorical moves as part of a larger project which shows the argument that psychedelic experience have no philosophical value to be incorrect. By using the tools that philosopher, Michel Foucault employs, I describe an archaeology of psychedelic rhetoric as it has passed thought the decades to now. This research changes the way we see value in the psychedelic experience and opens academic channels to discuss the philosophical value it provides.

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May 19th, 6:00 PM May 19th, 6:05 PM

Three Waves of Psychedelic Literature

Carwein Auditorium (KEY 102), UW Tacoma

For this presentation, I will use textual analysis of psychedelic literature to show the three major movements within the genre, which demonstrate the philosophical value of the experience.

The first wave of psychedelic literature, particularly well exemplified by Aldous Huxley, popularized there psychedelic experience through nonfiction. It drew on the novelty of the experience and benefited from the optimism of the pre-“War on Drugs” era. The second wave of literature reflects the popularization of the psychedelic experience in a bohemian public setting, infusing psychedelic literature with spiritual overtones. During this second wave, the casual use of psychedelics was popularized without an awareness of the potential problems associated with casual use, leading to negative outcomes and the criminalization of psychedelic drug use. In the current third wave, psychedelic literature has become more academic in tone with a focus on the mental health benefits of psychedelics for people suffering from terminal illness, depression and PTSD.

I analyze the rhetorical moves as part of a larger project which shows the argument that psychedelic experience have no philosophical value to be incorrect. By using the tools that philosopher, Michel Foucault employs, I describe an archaeology of psychedelic rhetoric as it has passed thought the decades to now. This research changes the way we see value in the psychedelic experience and opens academic channels to discuss the philosophical value it provides.

http://digitalcommons.tacoma.uw.edu/tactalks/2016/spring/10