Degree Name

Doctor of Educational Leadership (EdD)

Department

Education

Streaming Media

Location

Carwein Auditorium (KEY 102), UW Tacoma

Event Website

http://guides.lib.uw.edu/tactalks

Start Date

19-5-2016 6:45 PM

End Date

19-5-2016 6:50 PM

Abstract

Background: Students with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD) enter college with persisting adaptive behavior needs impeding academic and employment outcomes. Research indicates independence in adaptive behaviors is more critical for outcome than IQ. Occupational therapy (OT) provides intervention to develop adaptive behaviors yet is often discontinued by secondary school.

Method: Qualitative instrumental, exploratory case study of Northwest college educating students with IDD regarding adaptive behavior needs in relation to scope of OT.

Participants: Thirty-one participants secured through purposive and snowball sampling included college: administrators; instructors; OTs; parents or guardians; and students.

Data Collection: Data collection used in-depth interviews supported by demographic survey, class observations, document review, Vineland Adaptive Behaviors Scales-II, and reflections.

Data Analysis: Data were organized, coded, analyzed, and interpreted relative to analytic categories derived from literature and research questions: (1) persisting needs; (2) current supports promoting student success; (3) if needs fell under scope of OT; and (4) perceptions of participants regarding OT.

Findings: (1) students demonstrated low adaptive behaviors that fell within OT practice yet inconsistently addressed; (2) unfamiliarity with OT; and (3) OT requires a systems change to prepare secondary and postsecondary students with IDD.

Final Note: Migliore and Butterworth (2008) shared students with IDD with at least some college may earn 73% more. Interventions for secondary and postsecondary students with IDD to increase adaptive skills may promote successful outcomes in college and employment settings.

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May 19th, 6:45 PM May 19th, 6:50 PM

Responding to Their Voice: The Needs of Postsecondary Students with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities

Carwein Auditorium (KEY 102), UW Tacoma

Background: Students with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD) enter college with persisting adaptive behavior needs impeding academic and employment outcomes. Research indicates independence in adaptive behaviors is more critical for outcome than IQ. Occupational therapy (OT) provides intervention to develop adaptive behaviors yet is often discontinued by secondary school.

Method: Qualitative instrumental, exploratory case study of Northwest college educating students with IDD regarding adaptive behavior needs in relation to scope of OT.

Participants: Thirty-one participants secured through purposive and snowball sampling included college: administrators; instructors; OTs; parents or guardians; and students.

Data Collection: Data collection used in-depth interviews supported by demographic survey, class observations, document review, Vineland Adaptive Behaviors Scales-II, and reflections.

Data Analysis: Data were organized, coded, analyzed, and interpreted relative to analytic categories derived from literature and research questions: (1) persisting needs; (2) current supports promoting student success; (3) if needs fell under scope of OT; and (4) perceptions of participants regarding OT.

Findings: (1) students demonstrated low adaptive behaviors that fell within OT practice yet inconsistently addressed; (2) unfamiliarity with OT; and (3) OT requires a systems change to prepare secondary and postsecondary students with IDD.

Final Note: Migliore and Butterworth (2008) shared students with IDD with at least some college may earn 73% more. Interventions for secondary and postsecondary students with IDD to increase adaptive skills may promote successful outcomes in college and employment settings.

http://digitalcommons.tacoma.uw.edu/tactalks/2016/spring/5