Presenter Information

William ToweyFollow

Degree Name

Master of Interdisciplinary Studies (MA)

Department

Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences

Streaming Media

Location

UW Tacoma - William W. Philip Hall, Milgard Assembly Room

Event Website

http://guides.lib.uw.edu/tactalks

Start Date

18-5-2017 6:10 PM

End Date

18-5-2017 6:15 PM

Abstract

Gentrification continues to be a central concern for residents of formerly under-served and under-resourced areas of many cities that begin to experience economic development. For some stakeholders Gentrification represents a boon of economic opportunity, growth, development, new tax base and profits. Yet, often-times Gentrification can have a much different meaning and outcome for existing residents of the area. My research examines how the negative effects of Gentrification— that center in displacement, loss of community identity, and economic development that often does not benefit existing community (directly or indirectly)—can be mitigated by nonprofit Community Based Organizations (CBOs) and local government. This collaborative effort of coordinated community response to Gentrification is reflected in the term Centrification. My research looks at how local governments are working with community nonprofit organizations to successfully serve what are often two conflicting forces—economic development and community security and stabilization — that usually arrive together with the onset of Gentrification. I then examine the premise of Centrification through the role and practices of CBOs, nonprofits, and advocacy groups in the Tacoma area that work to build community engagement, raise-up and prioritize efforts to avoid displacement for existing residents, and champion their opportunities and value in the face of Gentrification.

My research reviews the historical policy and practices of several decades that has caused a recent relocation of 35% of the African American population out of the Hilltop area. It also reviews the more recent efforts by the City of Tacoma to address the potential negative impacts of Gentrification and examine how that work has been implemented in partnership with community Nonprofits, CBO’s, and other community based private/public groups.

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May 18th, 6:10 PM May 18th, 6:15 PM

The Battle of Gentrification vs. Centrification: The Role of the Nonprofit Sector and the Hilltop of Tacoma

UW Tacoma - William W. Philip Hall, Milgard Assembly Room

Gentrification continues to be a central concern for residents of formerly under-served and under-resourced areas of many cities that begin to experience economic development. For some stakeholders Gentrification represents a boon of economic opportunity, growth, development, new tax base and profits. Yet, often-times Gentrification can have a much different meaning and outcome for existing residents of the area. My research examines how the negative effects of Gentrification— that center in displacement, loss of community identity, and economic development that often does not benefit existing community (directly or indirectly)—can be mitigated by nonprofit Community Based Organizations (CBOs) and local government. This collaborative effort of coordinated community response to Gentrification is reflected in the term Centrification. My research looks at how local governments are working with community nonprofit organizations to successfully serve what are often two conflicting forces—economic development and community security and stabilization — that usually arrive together with the onset of Gentrification. I then examine the premise of Centrification through the role and practices of CBOs, nonprofits, and advocacy groups in the Tacoma area that work to build community engagement, raise-up and prioritize efforts to avoid displacement for existing residents, and champion their opportunities and value in the face of Gentrification.

My research reviews the historical policy and practices of several decades that has caused a recent relocation of 35% of the African American population out of the Hilltop area. It also reviews the more recent efforts by the City of Tacoma to address the potential negative impacts of Gentrification and examine how that work has been implemented in partnership with community Nonprofits, CBO’s, and other community based private/public groups.

http://digitalcommons.tacoma.uw.edu/tactalks/2017/spring/3