Presenter Information

Mycol ReamerFollow

Degree Name

Master of Interdisciplinary Studies (MA)

Department

Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences

Streaming Media

Location

UW Tacoma - William W. Philip Hall, Milgard Assembly Room

Event Website

http://guides.lib.uw.edu/tactalks

Start Date

18-5-2017 5:30 PM

End Date

18-5-2017 5:35 PM

Abstract

The concepts of freedom and greed are a common theme in writing, and this is also true of the Roman historian Tacitus, who used libertas (freedom) and cupiditas (greed) in his writings. By using the revolt of the Celtic Queen of the Iceni, the revolt of Boudicca in Briton during 60-61 CE exemplifies these ideas of libertas and cupiditas. This thesis will compare Tacitus’s his writings of Boudicca to other women, and Celtic figures of Briton who resisted Roman rule. It will also show that Tacitus’s use of libertas was used as a cause for action, while cupiditas in his works leads to downfall or destruction.

We know that Tacitus was writing for an audience, and that audience were of his fellow Roman elites. We also know that he was writing in the form of a parable, as many ancient historians did. This is exemplified by works such as Rhetoric in Classical Historiography, where author A.J. Woodman states that Tacitus, like the Roman Hhistorians before him, were writing on the slow moral decline of the Republic. Armed with this knowledge, the story of Boudicca can be viewed in a new light. She began her revolt with libertas as an objective, to keep her people free form from slavery and Roman oppression. However, Boudicca has her own slow moral decline, and gives into her own hubris and greed, and thus cupiditas is her downfall in her final battle, known as the battle of Watling Street.

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May 18th, 5:30 PM May 18th, 5:35 PM

Boudicca: Through the Eyes of the Ancients

UW Tacoma - William W. Philip Hall, Milgard Assembly Room

The concepts of freedom and greed are a common theme in writing, and this is also true of the Roman historian Tacitus, who used libertas (freedom) and cupiditas (greed) in his writings. By using the revolt of the Celtic Queen of the Iceni, the revolt of Boudicca in Briton during 60-61 CE exemplifies these ideas of libertas and cupiditas. This thesis will compare Tacitus’s his writings of Boudicca to other women, and Celtic figures of Briton who resisted Roman rule. It will also show that Tacitus’s use of libertas was used as a cause for action, while cupiditas in his works leads to downfall or destruction.

We know that Tacitus was writing for an audience, and that audience were of his fellow Roman elites. We also know that he was writing in the form of a parable, as many ancient historians did. This is exemplified by works such as Rhetoric in Classical Historiography, where author A.J. Woodman states that Tacitus, like the Roman Hhistorians before him, were writing on the slow moral decline of the Republic. Armed with this knowledge, the story of Boudicca can be viewed in a new light. She began her revolt with libertas as an objective, to keep her people free form from slavery and Roman oppression. However, Boudicca has her own slow moral decline, and gives into her own hubris and greed, and thus cupiditas is her downfall in her final battle, known as the battle of Watling Street.

http://digitalcommons.tacoma.uw.edu/tactalks/2017/spring/6