Presenter Information

Frelimo Omari AmiliFollow

Degree Name

Master of Interdisciplinary Studies (MA)

Department

Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences

Streaming Media

Location

Carwein Auditorium (KEY 102), UW Tacoma

Event Website

http://guides.lib.uw.edu/tactalks

Start Date

19-5-2016 6:10 PM

End Date

19-5-2016 6:15 PM

Abstract

In the United States of America there are more people incarcerated than in any other developed country. The majority of people released from incarceration become recidivists. Many people who are incarcerated serve their time and return to the same circumstances that led to their incarceration. First time offenders are often released to much worse circumstances because they now have their options limited by a criminal conviction. Despite these unfortunate realities, the potential within many people affected by this vicious cycle can still be reached.

Many researchers have concluded that post-secondary education can have a positive impact on preventing recidivism. Through pursuing an education, formerly incarcerated college students embark on a transformative journey that leads to a reduced risk of becoming a recidivist. In addition to new opportunities for employment, transitioning from prison to college can play a role in reshaping character, identity, and values for the formerly incarcerated.

In this presentation I provide an overview of my project through which I am producing a curriculum and workbook for use in a college preparatory workshop for the formerly incarcerated. It uses autoethnography to provide a qualitative account of the lived experience of transitioning from prison to college. Those lived experiences were analyzed to determine the content of the workshop and workbook. When people successfully transition from a life of crime to becoming productive members of society it impacts far more than just that individual but rather entire communities of people.

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May 19th, 6:10 PM May 19th, 6:15 PM

Preventing Recidivism Through Post-Secondary Education: A College Prep Workshop for the Formerly Incarcerated

Carwein Auditorium (KEY 102), UW Tacoma

In the United States of America there are more people incarcerated than in any other developed country. The majority of people released from incarceration become recidivists. Many people who are incarcerated serve their time and return to the same circumstances that led to their incarceration. First time offenders are often released to much worse circumstances because they now have their options limited by a criminal conviction. Despite these unfortunate realities, the potential within many people affected by this vicious cycle can still be reached.

Many researchers have concluded that post-secondary education can have a positive impact on preventing recidivism. Through pursuing an education, formerly incarcerated college students embark on a transformative journey that leads to a reduced risk of becoming a recidivist. In addition to new opportunities for employment, transitioning from prison to college can play a role in reshaping character, identity, and values for the formerly incarcerated.

In this presentation I provide an overview of my project through which I am producing a curriculum and workbook for use in a college preparatory workshop for the formerly incarcerated. It uses autoethnography to provide a qualitative account of the lived experience of transitioning from prison to college. Those lived experiences were analyzed to determine the content of the workshop and workbook. When people successfully transition from a life of crime to becoming productive members of society it impacts far more than just that individual but rather entire communities of people.

http://digitalcommons.tacoma.uw.edu/tactalks/2016/spring/8