Location

University of Washington Tacoma

Event Website

http://www.tacoma.uw.edu/node/37078

Start Date

9-7-2015 3:45 PM

End Date

9-7-2015 5:00 PM

Description

Generally Japanese society does not value or encourage self-promotion. Therefore, Japanese corporations are generally quiet about corporate social responsibility (CSR). One Japanese multinational manufacturer of seasoning, Ajinomoto, does not fall into this category. Unlike the majority of the Japanese business community, Ajinomoto trumpets their CSR in the public sector. The top Japanese corporations normally choose not to pronounce their CSR, believing that it is not necessary to highlight their CSR activities if the company is basically doing what is considered the “right thing” for society. For this reason, Ajinomoto was selected for study because the case is unusual from cultural and business standpoints. This research utilizes two traditional qualitative data: documents and observations. The inquiry finds that Ajinomoto is distinctive in terms of CSR communication. Ajinomoto employees conduct food education lessons in public elementary schools and remind children and teachers of the importance of traditional Japanese food culture. They have face-to-face meetings with school officials in advance. They clearly communicate with teachers regarding the concept of corporate social responsibility and most importantly, they conduct lessons without overt product promotion. This case may identify a new chapter in the history of Japanese CSR.

Comments

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Jul 9th, 3:45 PM Jul 9th, 5:00 PM

Self-promotion No Longer Leaves a Bad Taste: Ajinomoto’s CSR Activity in Japanese Schools

University of Washington Tacoma

Generally Japanese society does not value or encourage self-promotion. Therefore, Japanese corporations are generally quiet about corporate social responsibility (CSR). One Japanese multinational manufacturer of seasoning, Ajinomoto, does not fall into this category. Unlike the majority of the Japanese business community, Ajinomoto trumpets their CSR in the public sector. The top Japanese corporations normally choose not to pronounce their CSR, believing that it is not necessary to highlight their CSR activities if the company is basically doing what is considered the “right thing” for society. For this reason, Ajinomoto was selected for study because the case is unusual from cultural and business standpoints. This research utilizes two traditional qualitative data: documents and observations. The inquiry finds that Ajinomoto is distinctive in terms of CSR communication. Ajinomoto employees conduct food education lessons in public elementary schools and remind children and teachers of the importance of traditional Japanese food culture. They have face-to-face meetings with school officials in advance. They clearly communicate with teachers regarding the concept of corporate social responsibility and most importantly, they conduct lessons without overt product promotion. This case may identify a new chapter in the history of Japanese CSR.

https://digitalcommons.tacoma.uw.edu/clsr_academic/2015/pres/14